Railways and coal mines 2

It is of course important that the new branch lines to be built will be finacially viable, and to encourage investment in both the lines and the engines, that a clear plan is presented.
The research  that was done before the lines were closed was seriosly flawed, many of the lines were in fact viable, or could easily have been made so.
The stations even in the smaller towns must be brought alive. Space must be provided for free parking, at least for the passengers. The ticket offices could be run in the same way as sub-post offices work, that is the person who sells the tickets runs another business the rest of the time, or a library could be installed at the station and the tickets sold by the librarian. Government departments will be required to have offices for the public in small towns, to allow people to have information or resolve problems with pensions, benefits, tax, etc. These services could all use the same space each one present at a different time of the week. The receptionist could perhaps also sell railway tickets. Where possible there should be a cafe. If this is run as a traditional English cafe, the revolutionary government will provide incentives, such as very low rent ant rates. The steam Engines will be an attraction for touristes, and it is important to present English culture to them, not least because having sampled English sausages, bacon, ┬ácheese, scones, pork pies, Cornish pasties and so on, I’m sure it will encourage exports of these items.

Parking charges

It is very unfair to traders in towns and villages that car owners are charged parking fees to visit them, but not to visit out of town complexes. From an environmental point of view, it is exactly the same if a person drives from his home in the city, to the outskirts to shop, as it is for someone to drive from the outskirts into the city to shop. City centre shops also attract shoppers on foot or train far more than out of town complexes.

Traffic jams are usually much worse on ring roads and near shopping centres than in city centres. All on-street parking should be free, and councils should allow as much parking space as possible and time limits should allow at least 3 hours.

The environly friendly measure would be to charge for parking at supermarkets, but I don’t propose this, as it’s contrary to the freedom to be poor.